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It’s not fun until someone loses an eye.

By on Jun 29, 2010 in fantasy, indigo and ink, weird, WIP, writing | 2 comments

I grossed myself out today during writing. I don’t know if it’s because the AC is broken and it’s 90 degrees up here and the humidity is through the roof, but I apparently needed to outdo myself in fiction. It was one of those weird moments where I’d planned for the scene to go one way and it took a sharp, brutal detour in a direction I hadn’t anticipated. Like the title says, someone literally loses an eye in the process. Of his own volition. I can get away with a bit that I normally couldn’t in Dev’s narrative, because he’s on this Dante-esque journey. I’ve got to hit some of those high notes. But I realize whenever I talk about these chapters (which together work almost like a novella in the middle of the novel) I sound a bit daft. Anyway, I wanted to start recapping my writing progress with a little more panache, so I’m...

Birthday goals, and halfway there.

By on Jun 13, 2010 in fantasy, indigo and ink, publication, WIP, writing | 2 comments

No, this has nothing to do with football. (Or, soccer.) Just a quick one before the D&D game starts. My birthday is tomorrow, and I wanted to play D&D with our amazing group. However, I also wanted to achieve a personal birthday goal; I wanted to hit 55,000 in the WIP which marks the exact halfway point in the novel. I had until tomorrow to do this but finished today. Personal goals are important. It’s been hard for me this year, as I usually try to mimic the output of Important Published Writers. (I was reading a post of mine from last year when I wrote 35K in ten days at one point). I used to force myself to write 3K a day. But issues have meant that my output is slower. I can’t keep up as I used to. But still, this is not shabby. I started the book in March and it’s only June. My plan is to finish by September. I can do this. I have to do this, however it...

The Novel’s Life

By on Apr 23, 2010 in indigo and ink, WIP, writing | 5 comments

I have said it before: novels have lives of their own. Maybe I should expect it by now, but it still amazes me how a book can simply do things that I didn’t anticipate–often without my permission. Case in point, my current work in progress Dustman. The idea for this book was simple: girl loves boy, boy goes mad, girl gets married to man who promises to care for boy, man loses boy, girl goes on quest to find boy. (Okay, not simple simple, but you know.) For me it’s even simpler, since I’m using a pre-developed world. It just started out with three characters, and three points of view. Then a fourth appeared, and I figured that was okay… I would let him. He’s cute. But aside from character, this book is quickly becoming one of the most complex I’ve ever plotted. Sure, I’ve had intertwining narratives in a multi-POV story before; I love...

Six Ways Twitter Can Make You A Better Writer

By on Jan 9, 2010 in blog, WIP, writing | 20 comments

Many people consider Twitter solely¬†for networking purposes, for meeting people with common interests and conversing. And while that’s a big part of it, Twitter can also be a very useful tool for improving your writing. When I first started building my Twitter follow list, I started with a lot of writers. And soon I discovered, mostly through feeds of people like Jay Lake and Paul Jessup, the #wip hashtag. Easy enough, WIP stands for “work in progress”. Basically, writers sample little 140 character or less sections from their work, sharing it with their friends and followers. Not every writer does this (either some don’t like the attention it brings, while others might feel it’s a little too flashy or something) I’ve found it very helpful for a number of reasons. Most importantly, excerpting your #wip brings people into your creative process. It...

Crowded house: writing a party

By on Jun 4, 2009 in fantasy, Uncategorized, WIP, writing | 1 comment

Nah, not the kind with ale and food and wenches, though that happens from time to time. More like a party of people. At the moment I’m struggling with some of my chapters, as there are just too many damned people there all the time. Up until this point most of what I’ve written has been fairly straight-forward, with a handful of people doing fairly straight-forward things. Two, maybe three people in conversation, nice tight little story arcs… It was particularly comfortable in The Aldersgate because, well, every chapter was a new point of view, and helped me keep things neat and in a row. Now, in Peter of Windbourne, all of the sudden there are at least five people in just about every single scene. Oh sure I can write it out. Sure I can finagle it. But that doesn’t give me many options. Not to mention that my inability to balance characters was one of the...